Friday, July 13, 2012

The Wisdom of G.K. Chesterton

“It is absurd for the Evolutionist to complain that it is unthinkable for an admittedly unthinkable God to make everything out of nothing, and then pretend that it is more thinkable that nothing should turn itself into everything.”

“Impartiality is a pompous name for indifference which is an elegant name for ignorance.”

“A dead thing goes with the stream, but only a living thing can go against it.”

“Christianity has not been tried and found wanting; it has been found difficult and not tried.”


“Fairy Tales are more than true; not because they tell us that dragons exist, but because they tell us that dragons can be beaten.”

“When you break the big laws, you do not get liberty; you do not even get anarchy. You get the small laws.”

“Carlyle said that men were mostly fools. Christianity, with a surer and more reverend realism, says that they are all fools.”

“In so far as I am Man I am the chief of creatures. In so far as I am a Man I am the chief of sinners.”


“There is only one very timid sort of man that is not afraid of women.”

“When a man has found something which he prefers to life, he then for the first time begins to live.”

“Politicians have to be progressive; that is, they have to live in the future, because they know that they have done nothing but evil in the past.”

“The only persons who seem to have nothing to do with the education of the children are the parents.”


“The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.”

“One can sometimes do good by being the right person in the wrong place.”

5 comments:

Just the Facts! said...

“Politicians have to be progressive; that is, they have to live in the future, because they know that they have done nothing but evil in the past.”

Great quote!
Thanks

Just the Facts

John Myste said...

“It is absurd for the Evolutionist to complain that it is unthinkable for an admittedly unthinkable God to make everything out of nothing, and then pretend that it is more thinkable that nothing should turn itself into everything.”

Ahahahaaha.

“Impartiality is a pompous name for indifference which is an elegant name for ignorance.”

While I agree with this, admitting ignorance is the first step to finding wisdom and understanding, a step most of us refuse to take. Ignorance has a unfair reputation.

“Christianity has not been tried and found wanting; it has been found difficult and not tried.”

They are not mutually exclusive my friend. Both statements are true.

“When men cease to believe in God, they will believe in anything.”

How absurdly unscientific. And why did you put Obama’s picture next to the quote? He is an example of someone duped by the Christian concept of God.

“When a man has found something which he prefers to life, he then for the first time begins to live.”

Actually, living is a prerequisite to preferring life, but nice try.

“Once abolish the God and the government becomes the God.”

Are we loyal to the Constitution or to God? You cannot submit yourself to two masters.

“One can sometimes do good by being the right person in the wrong place.”

Hmmm. I think I need some examples.

T. Paine said...

JTF, I agree!

Myste, see the following, sir:

Post: “It is absurd for the Evolutionist to complain that it is unthinkable for an admittedly unthinkable God to make everything out of nothing, and then pretend that it is more thinkable that nothing should turn itself into everything.”

Myste: Ahahahaaha.

T. Paine: That is quite a powerful rebuttal, John! :)



Post: “Impartiality is a pompous name for indifference which is an elegant name for ignorance.”

Myste: While I agree with this, admitting ignorance is the first step to finding wisdom and understanding, a step most of us refuse to take. Ignorance has a unfair reputation.

T. Paine: I concur with your comment, while still fully embracing Chesterton’s original statement.




Post: “Christianity has not been tried and found wanting; it has been found difficult and not tried.”

Myste: They are not mutually exclusive my friend. Both statements are true.

T. Paine: I humbly disagree, sir. It is my opinion that if true Christianity is tried (lived) with an open mind and a true heart, then it cannot be found wanting by anyone of sound mind and soul. It is transformational in our very essence.



Post: “When men cease to believe in God, they will believe in anything.”

Myste: How absurdly unscientific. And why did you put Obama’s picture next to the quote? He is an example of someone duped by the Christian concept of God.

T. Paine: Chesterton’s observation wasn’t so much from a scientific perspective in the technical sense of the word, but rather an insight into the human condition. As for Obama, at the risk of falling into a Dubya-rant stereotype, I am not certain that our president is a Christian. Through my observations, I think his brand of Christianity was more to further his political career than to serve the purpose for which our Lord meant it to be.



Post: “When a man has found something which he prefers to life, he then for the first time begins to live.”

Myste: Actually, living is a prerequisite to preferring life, but nice try.

T. Paine: I concede your point on semantics, but wonder how does that invalidate the context of Chesterton’s assertion?



Post: “Once abolish the God and the government becomes the God.”

Myste: Are we loyal to the Constitution or to God? You cannot submit yourself to two masters.

T. Paine: I would submit to you, my friend, that via the Constitutional governance of our nation, we allow the greatest amount of prosperity and freedom for all of our citizens, as God would have us live accordingly. In other words, the Constitution is a tool in which to govern justly as He would will it.



Post: “One can sometimes do good by being the right person in the wrong place.”

Myste: Hmmm. I think I need some examples.

T. Paine: I suppose it depends on how you define “the wrong place”. There are myriads of examples that are limited only by one’s imagination though.

John Myste said...

Myste: Ahahahaaha.

T. Paine: That is quite a powerful rebuttal, John! :)


There was no rebuttal in the comment. I was amused and expressed it. Why would I want to issue a rebuttal to the lone comment I found meritorious?

T. Paine: I humbly disagree, sir. It is my opinion that if true Christianity is tried (lived) with an open mind and a true heart, then it cannot be found wanting by anyone of sound mind and soul. It is transformational in our very essence.

You just described scientology, I believe.

Through my observations, I think his brand of Christianity was more to further his political career than to serve the purpose for which our Lord meant it to be.

Meant by whom, dear Paine?

Post: “When a man has found something which he prefers to life, he then for the first time begins to live.”

Myste: Actually, living is a prerequisite to preferring life, but nice try.

T. Paine: I concede your point on semantics, but wonder how does that invalidate the context of Chesterton’s assertion?


Nothing to invalidate, as Chesterton made no argument.

T. Paine: I would submit to you, my friend, that via the Constitutional governance of our nation, we allow the greatest amount of prosperity and freedom for all of our citizens, as God would have us live accordingly. In other words, the Constitution is a tool in which to govern justly as He would will it.

I suppose my point was missed. I was trying to point out the conflict of serving two masters. I did not, at this time, consider where the masters conflict relevant to the point.

Post: “One can sometimes do good by being the right person in the wrong place.”

Myste: Hmmm. I think I need some examples.

T. Paine: I suppose it depends on how you define “the wrong place”. There are myriads of examples that are limited only by one’s imagination though.


Myriads, meaning three, right?

T. Paine said...

T. Paine: I humbly disagree, sir. It is my opinion that if true Christianity is tried (lived) with an open mind and a true heart, then it cannot be found wanting by anyone of sound mind and soul. It is transformational in our very essence.
J. Myste: You just described scientology, I believe.
T. Paine: I do not pretend to know anything about scientology, but what I described is true Christianity.


T. Paine: Through my observations, I think his brand of Christianity was more to further his political career than to serve the purpose for which our Lord meant it to be.
J. Myste: Meant by whom, dear Paine?
T. Paine: Meant by our Lord, as I said. :)


T. Paine: I would submit to you, my friend, that via the Constitutional governance of our nation, we allow the greatest amount of prosperity and freedom for all of our citizens, as God would have us live accordingly. In other words, the Constitution is a tool in which to govern justly as He would will it.
J. Myste: I suppose my point was missed. I was trying to point out the conflict of serving two masters. I did not, at this time, consider where the masters conflict relevant to the point.
T. Paine: And I guess the point of my response was missed. I think I understood your point, my friend. I simply did not see the constitution as rising to the level of being a master on par with God, but rather as a tool so that God’s will of justice and fair governance of a free people could be secured.


Post: “One can sometimes do good by being the right person in the wrong place.”
Myste: Hmmm. I think I need some examples.
T. Paine: I suppose it depends on how you define “the wrong place”. There are myriads of examples that are limited only by one’s imagination though.
Myste: Myriads, meaning three, right?
T. Paine: Exactly! (smart aleck!)